Into the Deep End…

I’ve just finished Levels 06 and 07 of the GPC. Not much to say about the first lessons within Level 06 – they introduced GMS’ built-in image editor – while adequate for what it is, there many better tools available.

Moving on, the one good take-away from Level 06 was learning that image animations don’t start from the first frame by default – instead, they pick up wherever you are within each step.

So if you trigger an action that calls for an animation change (e.g. transitioning from idle to movement), the second animation (movement) will NOT begin on frame 0 by default, instead, it will pick up whether the animation should have been with respect to the current step!

As such, it’s useful to lead with image_index=0 to ensure that the animations start where they are supposed to.

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Level 07 was short, and lacked the continuity established in the previous lessons. Functions were thrown about in rapid succession without stopping to really explain what they did, instead, an exercise in, “RTM,” though not in so many words 🙂 .

Aside, January 11, 2017: I concede that there are hundreds, if not thousands of built-in GML functions, and not all of them could be covered in even a ~120 hour course. Moreover, some may be too obscure to be useful for most students, and the intent was to get the user familiar with the help file and looking up function syntax when needed.

Fair enough – so why kick up a fuss about it now? Well, to this point (with the exception of Level 04), the course followed a very effective formula:

Introduce a new concept, usually built upon a solid foundation of core skills developed throughout the course. In order for the concept to be useful, it has to be framed in a context that’s meaningful to the student. Absent that, the exercise becomes meaningless and rote; disconnected from other concepts and quickly forgotten.

My recommendation would be to change the name of Level 07 to “Vector Functions and Collision Checking” – I would remove “scripts” because that isn’t really covered until Level 08, and only hinted at in Level 07.

While Level 07 defines what Functions/Methods and Arguments/Parameters are, we’ve been using them since Level 02, and could continue using them blissfully ignorant of what they are called, that is until Level 08 where it really becomes necessary to understand them.

Take that out, and what you are left with are numerous examples, all concerning either Vector or Collision Checking functions (i.e. point_direction, position_empty, point_in_circle, instance_furthest/nearest…), and use examples of games where these are useful or necessary (e.g. tower defense, homing missiles etc.).

Level 08 is more promising thus far, but looking ahead, the good stuff is going to be found in Levels 11-15.

Time!

Happy New Year, and Happy Birthday, Eric!

Today I worked through Level 05 of the GPC. Level 03 introduced the irandom_range function, and provided a few examples of how I could throttle when actions occured – remember that in GML, action happens according to game speed (30 by default, or 30 steps/second).

This time, instead of leaving something up to random chance in hopes that it falls on the correct number or number range, we learned how to guarantee that the action occurred at a specified interval. This happened one of two ways:

  1. Using a counter – declare an instance variable in the create event for an object and set a value:
    //"counter" is the name of the variable, 
    //you could call it anything you wanted...
    //we set it to 0 so that it could count up 
    //in the STEP EVENT later
    
     counter=0

    Then create a step event (an event that cycles x# of iterations, 1 for every point you’ve set the game speed to):

    //add + 1 to the counter every time the step runs, 
    // 30 times per second by default
    
    counter=counter+1
    
    //when the counter reaches 150, or 5 seconds, 
    //do something
    
    if counter >=150 {
    ...code whatever you want to happen here...
     }

     

  2. Using Alarms – a built-in counter you can use. Each object can have up to 12 different alarms in it. They work like this:From another event’s code, enter:
    //where 0 is the alarm # (0-11) and 90 is the 
    //# of steps to wait (3 seconds)
    
     alarm[0]=90

    When the alarm #0 goes off, you can execute a piece of code by adding an Alarm Event for that specific alarm #:

    //e.g. create an explosion in a random location 
    //on the screen
    
     effect_create_above (ef_explosion,irandom_range (100,600),irandom_range (100,600),0,c_orange)
    
    //makes the alarm reset to 3 seconds
    // comment out of if you want it to
    //only happen once.
    
    alarm[0]=90

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Level 05, Lesson 3: Getting Out of Sync

I’d like to preface this by acknowledging two points:

a. It’s FREE…I didn’t have to pay for ANY of this, yet all of it represents his own time, effort and money (i.e. hosting fees for his website, cost of recording equipment and software and so on).

b. John Janetka is teacher first and foremost – the GPC website, his YouTube channel and all the content therein are done in his spare time, and shared with me, you and everyone else who’s interested because he can and wants to, and with a ‘best-effort’ LoS.

Up to this point, I’d worked out that I needed to go to the website first, read the lesson, watch the video(s), then go back to the website to complete the challenges.

This pattern held true until you get to Level 05, Lesson 03.  The first thing he asks you to do in Part A is to read the notes on “L05-03-Reading01.pdf”. There isn’t a link to it on the website, or anywhere!

Then he asks you to watch the video 05-03-A to review said notes, but again, there is no such video on his YouTube channel!

Further down, he asks you to go through the questions in L05-03-ConceptQuestions01.pdf, which, like the notes, aren’t linked on the page or anywhere else…

So where are they? Well, after doing some digging, I found the word document versions buried in the Lv05 resource folder that was  included in the zip file from his resources page (the link labeled “Course Resources For All Levels”).

While I could have sworn that he’d touched on &&, || and != somewhere in one of his previous videos, they aren’t covered in any of the Level 05 videos up GPC-05-03-X1Preview. Not that it matters much as the lesson notes do a pretty good job explaining what they each do and when to use them.

By and large, the questions did a good job of reinforcing the lesson up to Part C, where the answers didn’t really follow the format he specified in his instructions…

SPOILER ALERT: Part C Questions and Answers

The question is phrased as follows:

Condition Is it ‘always true’ or ‘always false’?
if x>20 || x < 10
if points<20 || points>10
if life>=100 && life>50
if life>=100 && life<=0
if (points>10) && (points<20)

My answers were:

Condition Is it ‘always true’ or ‘always false’?
if x>20 || x < 10  Neither
if points<20 || points>10  Always True
if life>=100 && life>50 Neither
if life>=100 && life<=0  Always False
if (points>10) && (points<20)  Neither

His answers were:

Condition Is it ‘always true’ or ‘always false’ ?
if x>20 || x < 10 not always true
if points<20 || points>10 always true since one of the conditions must be true
if life>=100 && life>50 not always true  (ex. life is 25)
if life>=100 && life<=0 not always true  (ex. life is 50)
if (points>10) && (points<20) not always true

“Not always true” implies that it is sometimes false, when if fact, in some cases (e.g. if life>=100 && life<=0) it is ALWAYS False.

To check my answers, I wrote a test program which used the i_random_range function to generate a number every step between 0 and 200 (all of the examples above fall in that range).  From there, I ran each condition separately and had it display the result (true, false or both) each cycle, proving them correct.

I’ve provided it here, feel free to use it if you’d like.

…and yes, I probably spent waaaay more time on this than I reasonably should have, but it’s all good practice, right?

 

Later still in the same lesson, he tosses in some functions not previously covered (e.g. room_exists, room_goto_next etc.). I hope these will be covered in more depth later as this was the first time we’d played around with a project that had more than one screen.

Welp, on to the rest of the lesson! Stay tuned for more…

 

Image Credit: Don’t Hug Me, I’m Scared 2

Staying the Course[work]

In my last post, I began working my way through the free video lessons on www.gameprogrammingcourse.com and it’s associated YouTube channel.

It’s important to note that the YouTube channel is supplementary to the website, not the other way around; as such, if you arrive at the YouTube channel first (as I did) you might find yourself scratching your head when you get to the playlists, particularly where to start

If you’re looking for Level 01, that’s on his website here. There isn’t a video for this as you’re just downloading and installing GMS, the videos begin at Level 02.

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It’s hard to believe that it’s only been 2 days since I started these courses, and I just finished Level 04, which wasn’t a lesson series, but rather a series of challenges designed to utilize all the skills I’d acquired in Levels 02 and 03.

Random Solutions

One of the problems we’d be wrestling with is game speed and it’s effect on action timing. Suppose you plant a brick wall in front a horde of advancing peasants.

Event > Collision > Obj_Peasant > Obj_BrickWall

//subtracts 1 hitpoint from the brick wall upon collision
with other {
hp=hp-1
}

Assuming you’ve given the Obj_BrickWall an instance variable called “hp” (i.e. hitpoints) and assigned a numeric value to it (e.g. 100), it would take one peasant about 3.2 seconds or so to break it down as he’s colliding with it 30 times a second, dealing 1 damage each time.

My solution to this was simple, but lacking – give the wall more hitpoints, say 1000 for instance. This isn’t a very elegant way to handle this, but it worked, and it took a peasant about 32 seconds or so to break down the wall, which is what I was looking for.

Then I completed Level 03, and in the process of doing so, learned about irandom_range (#,#). What this does is allow you to replace any integer with randomized range of numbers. For example, you could have the peasant do a savings throw (much like a tabletop RPG) to determine whether or not he landed a successful blow. That would look something like this:

//Utilizes a random number to determine whether or not a hit is scored,
//subtracts 1 hitpoint from the brick wall upon successful roll.


savingsthrow=irandom_range(0,100)

If savingsthrow=1 {
with other {

hp=hp-1
}
}

As such, the peasant has ~30 chances a second to hit the wall, dealing 1 point of damage on every successful hit. Towards the end of Level 03, and a few times in Level 04, this method was used as a makeshift timer of sorts to throttle the speed of an event by adjusting the range (i.e. bigger range = more time, smaller range = less time).

Looking ahead toward Level 05, I suspect that this will be replaced with a far more precise way of handling timing.

Stepping Stones and a Clear Path Forward

Building on an Unstable Foundation

As we draw closer to a working prototype, it’s become increasingly more apparent that there are some fundamentally flawed issues with the way we’re going about implementation.

Eric is new to both programming in general (save for some college level coursework a few years ago), and GML. All in all, he’s got about 4 or 5 weeks worth of experience in total, but no formal training. As such, he doesn’t have a solid foundation of knowledge to build on, forcing him to seek out tutorials (usually YouTube videos) which give him ideas as to how a thing can be done.

The most popular videos are more akin to “Let’s Plays” with little (if any) structure, and even fewer explanations as to why the developer elected to go about doing things a certain way.

This forced Eric to look at what the other developer did, attempt reproduce it, then reverse engineer it without understanding what each piece’s purpose – trying different arrangements and configurations until it worked (or at least appeared to).

What troubled me was that sometimes I’d ask for a seemingly trivial feature only to find that he was unable to work out how to program it, and compromised with an implementation that wasn’t up to spec.

For example, instead of using keys 1-6 to toggle a different weapon type, and Ctrl to fire,  he mapped weapon type 1 to key 1 because from a logic standpoint, he had no idea how that would work, let alone how to frame the problem so that he could look it up.

Another example was the breakable wall from my prototype specifications in the last post. What I asked for was for wall, when placed, to take damage when it collided with the enemy, and update it’s animation frames to show progressively more damage before being destroyed.

Because he didn’t understand how variables worked, the wall was killing the enemy rather than the other way around – my suspicion was that he didn’t use the “with other” construct to indicate that it was the wall taking damage, not the enemy as they both had an instance variable called “hp” (i.e. hitpoints).

After a few more hours of working on it, he came back and this time the walls were taking damage, but being destroyed after only a second or two. This was because he was using the image_index property to advance the frames of damage to the wall sprite, destroying the object when it reached the end of the animation, foregoing hitpoints altogether.

Since the room speed was set to 30 (i.e. 30 cycles/second), the enemy was colliding with the wall 30 times a second, causing the wall to cycle through each frame of its sprite sheet within a fraction of a second. While this “appeared” to work, it in fact did not follow my design specifications (no hitpoint system) and was therefore not fit for purpose.

I suggested how this could be solved in pseudo code, but he insisted he tried that and it didn’t work – again, probably because of which object he was calling the variables from, but I didn’t know that either at the time.

So where could we go from here?

You Don’t Know What You Don’t Know…

The root of the issue was that while I understood the basic logic I wanted to use, I didn’t have the syntax for it, and neither did Eric. We needed to take a step back and learn the basics before trying to implement big, hairy, complicated features.

So again, I took to YouTube – we’d watched several of the Let’s Learn GameMaker: Studio channel’s videos, lots good information covering what was available and what options there were for each feature, but there was no practical application of those lessons; at at the end of the lesson, there was no example of a typical use case for that feature in your game

A Clear Path Forward

Just when I was about to give up, I managed to stumble upon another channel aptly named, Gamemaker Game Programming Course.  The channel is a bit confusing (the playlists in particular) until you work out that it’s actually just a video repository for his website:

www.gameprogrammingcourse.com

Start there, download the resource packs and project files, then start with the playlist labeled: Level 02 [ GameMaker Basics Sprites Objects Events ].

The site and videos were created by computer programming teacher named John Janetka for his high school’s computer science program. The quality of the content and structure of the lessons are the best I’ve come across on YouTube thus far.

By the end of Level 02, I was able to solve both of the programming issues Eric was struggling with above, and created two games in the process. Simple as they were, the experience was valuable.

I’d asked Eric to place his programming efforts on hold to go through this course with me. I asked him to try not to think of this as a step backward, but rather rather a stepping stone forward toward better, more stable code. He agreed, and will continue to check in every day or so to share what we’ve learned.

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Image Credit: “Martyn B

Disclaimer: I have no affiliation with any of the websites, applications or YouTube channels referenced above.

Finding a Direction

I hope the Holidays are going well for everyone!

As I mentioned in my previous post, Eric and I are working on our first game. We, like many other beginners, set out with a vague and nebulous concept of the feeling of the game we wanted to make.

So, I went off and worked on creating artwork with some very general design specifications:

  • 2D side perspective
  • 32×32 pixel character sprites
  • 16×16 pixel tiles (orthogonal)
  • Variable length traps (divisible by 16px)
  • 16 color EGA palette (CGA backwards compatibility)
  • Medieval/Fantasy Theme

Eric went away and started working on the programming:

  • Basic keyboard movement (left, right, jump)
  • Basic enemy movement (chase the player when in range)
  • A simple scenario where a specific enemy type (Torch wielding peasant) triggered an flammable barrel that exploded a bridge tile when he got near it
  • A water obstacle that enemies and the player fell through

The astute reader will pick up on the obvious item we missed: designing the game. What wasn’t immediately apparent to us was that we weren’t really building a game because we hadn’t defined what the game was – not even the basic object (i.e. how you win or lose) let alone the rules and mechanics…We were diving into polish (animations, effects etc.) before we even agreed on the scope of a working prototype!

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Why this happened…

It’s a common mistake for beginners like us to go into too much elaboration too quickly because it feels good to see a result that resembles a finished (read: polished) product. What we were doing wasn’t play testing because there wasn’t a game to play – instead, we were simply validating pieces of code.

The fact is, a game doesn’t need fancy graphics, particle effects, sound effects and background music to be a game (e.g. Pong).

What we did next…

At this point, I halted work and called for a meeting with Eric to hammer out the game mechanics, then create a working prototype.

Eric comes from a creative writing background and isn’t troubled by ambiguity; he never questioned why or how the exploding barrel would get to the bridge, and what tactical or strategic purpose destroy a bridge would serve in the context of the game. Instead, the novelty of this scenario was self-evident to him and required no explanation.

When I asked him to describe the game to me, and what I got, while interesting from a story/scenario perspective, was conspicuously lacking a clear definition of what the game was.

So I took stab at it instead:

Beaster’s Dungeon (my working title for the game) is a 2D platforming game where the player must stop oncoming hordes of peasants and heroes from reaching your treasure by collecting resources and plans needed to create and place deadly traps and obstructions in their path.

That’s a pitch – it tells you everything you need to know about how the game fundamentally works, and Eric agreed. From that pitch, we can distill this into a basic objective:

The player “wins” by destroying all enemies before they reach the treasure, and advances to the next level. The player “loses” by either dying (taking too much enemy or environmental damage) or one enemy reaches the treasure.

So, from that would derive several essential components:

  • Obj_Beaster: We needed an object to control the player character on screen. The object must be able to navigate in a 2D environment (move left, right, jump, collide with other objects).
  • Obj_[EnemyName]: We needed at least one test enemy that followed a set path to the treasure, stopping only to attack obstructions that got in it’s way. For pacing reasons, enemies would need to give the player a 90 second head-start to collect resources and place obstructions/traps.
  • Obj_Wall_Destructible: This was an afterthought, but seemed like a good way to allow the player to control the pace of the enemy horde(s) to give traps more time to kill them. The wall would take x# of hits before crumbling and allowing the enemy to continue on it’s path.
  • Obj_[TrapName]: We needed at least one trap that damaged an enemy that collided with it. The player would be able to place traps when he had collected both the trap’s “plan” (recipe) and a sufficient number of resources to build said trap.
  • Obj_[ResourcesName]: We need at least one resource object that, when collected, adds +1 to a resource counter. When a trap that utilizes that resource is placed, it adds -1 to the counter.
  • Obj_[PlanName]: In order to create a specific type of trap, the player must first possess the “plan” for that trap.  This object would update the player’s inventory to establish whether or not the player is able to place said trap.
  • Rm_TestLevel1: GameMaker studio utilizes “Rooms” to create environments where objects, backgrounds and tiles exist. You can think of these as the “level” where all of action is taking place. The level would need to have a clear path from point A (the origin of the enemies) to point B (the treasure) with enough room for the player to set up his gauntlet. It would need at least 1 trap plan, and be populated with sufficient resources to construct enough traps to kill all incoming enemies.

Once these components were present and behaving as described, we would have a prototype to test the basic functionality of the game.

Notes, Influences, Theories and Rationale

Looking at the game above, what we have described is essentially a “Metroidvania”, Lemmings in Reverse tower defense game. Sound extraneous? Perhaps, but that’s what the Prototype is intended to test. Let’s break that down into phases and game play:

Metroidvania refers to 2D platform exploration. This is where resources and plans come into play; they are placed in such a way as to encourage the player to get off the beaten path and explore to sprawling dungeon. Since the game happens in real-time (not turn-based), the player has to manage the tasks of collecting resources and placing traps while the enemy is slowly advancing toward the treasure.

Note: The game has gravity (i.e. not a top down 2D game, such as Legend of Zelda) so the player falls when moving off of a platform.

To keep the player from getting into an unwinnable/unloseable game, the enemies would have to follow a set path while allowing the player freedom of movement the enemy doesn’t have. To that effect, the player and move left, right, jump up onto platforms to get to areas above the enemy, and drop down from specific platforms to those below the enemy (think Contra).

Lemmings in Reserve is the notion that it was more fun to deliberately kill the Lemmings than steer them to safety, and is key to bridging the gap between a classic 2D platformer and a pure tower defense game.

If the enemies were left to freely roam the dungeon looking for the player or the treasure, it becomes possible for them to wander into a place they can’t get out of, rendering the level unwinnable (and unloseable).

Tower Defense is the most ubiquitous description for idea of using “traps” or turrets to destroy oncoming enemies. We felt that this genre had been done to death, and wanted to introduce the exploration component as a way to add challenge and depth to an otherwise dull experience.

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Predictions? Too early to tell, but once we have a working prototype, we can determine how pacing will work. From early “play tests” we’ve done, I can already tell that we will have to have some kind of mini-map or other visual indicators to let the player know that the enemy is attacking and where. It’s too easy to get lost in the labyrinth of the resource floors (i.e. platforms outside of the enemy path) and not know where the enemy is and if you are in danger of losing the level.

There’s got to be balance between the exploration and trap setup portions so that the player has to do both and will be rewarded for good time/space management.

Hello World…Again: A Fresh Start

V-Toad Lives!

After a long hiatus, we’re finally back with a long post, TL;DR be damned, dammit!

I say ‘we’ rather than ‘me’ because I’m now working with an old and dear friend of mine, Eric. I’ve since moved my old posts from veritastoad.wordpress.com to my own web server, and custom URL.

Eric and I have been friends for nearly two decades, and had collaborated on several projects dating back to my first attempts at video game development some 14 years ago. Dissatisfied, over-educated and unemployed, both of us were looking for a way out of grind. Never has there been a better time for indie game developers to jump in and make great games – we are hoping to follow in the footsteps of the likes of Derek YuScott Cawthon, and Locomalito.

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Division of Labor

As I’ve lamented previously, I am simply not a “triple threat”, which is to say that I while I am a mediocre artist and a decent composer, I am not a programmer. That’s where Eric comes in – with a degree in Electronic Engineering, Eric has had a lot of exposure to programming (or at least more than I have), and volunteered to try.

We still needed a game engine, and since GameSalad dropped it’s free-to-use model, we sought out other alternatives, eventually settling on GameMaker Studio.

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False Starts, New and Colorful Beginnings

We had a brief false start around June of 2016. Creating graphics confounded me for reasons I couldn’t explain at the time, but now better understand (more on that later). My first attempts at pixel art were terrible, and I simply didn’t know how to go about creating a sprite sheet. While looking for free-to-use artwork to help me get started, I stumbled upon Locomalito’s sprite sheet for l’Abbaye des Morts on OpenGameArt.org, and through that, the game itself.

This lead to us trying out our hands at an unofficial sequel of l’Abbaye des Morts nominally entitled, Monk’s Revenge.Within about 2 weeks, we had a complete design document created, a few level iterations using the original sprites and some modified graphics.

The objective wasn’t to make money but to practice and learn.

Unfortunately, this project was interrupted by my relocation back to the US, and between that and Eric’s workload for his Master’s degree classwork, our progress was mired. When we picked things back up about a month ago, our mutual interest in creating Monk’s Revenge had since diminished in favor creating an original title. We’d learned all we needed to from it, and it didn’t seem worthwhile to move ahead knowing that it would always be shackled by licensing requirements as derivative work.

Instead, we hashed out a new game idea and Eric got to work on the new design document while I delved further into the alchemy of pixel art.

I studied tiles from my favorite 8-bit games growing up, and read up on old graphics modes for IBM Compatible PC’s (what I grew up with) and their limitations. One of Pyxel Edit’s built-in palette sets is “EGA 16” (which is actually the color set used for CGA backwards compatibility):

EGA 16-color palette

Having a limited set of options forced me to think about how the colors fit together, giving the art a genuine “retro” aesthetic. I started with a simple 16×16 pixel block (enlarged to 64×64 to show detail):

From there, I tried different color combinations and variations:

16-color tileset

The building blocks of the world(s) we will go on to create were starting to take shape, and my confident in my ability to create pixel art was starting to grow.

Just as important to our new game’s visuals would be the game’s sound and background music. Using only 4 channels and the original NES pulses, noise, triangle and PCM voices, I could some great sounding 8-bit accompaniment for the action:

 

So there you have it!

So what’s next? Expect more updates as we wrestle with new challenges creating our first game, Beaster’s Dungeon!

TANSTAFS: There Ain’t No Such Thing as a Free Salad!

Update – August 11, 2015: I received an email from GameSalad asking if I’d consider the Basic version for a $4 discount ($15/month). While I don’t take issue with  paying for a tool, I don’t think a subscription model is a good fit for the Basic version. I would rather pay a flat, one-time fee, and pay again for upgrades, if I wanted them.

I could even advocate paying a subscription for service (online publishing) and support, but if all I can do is publish to the GameSalad arcade, it’s just not worth it :(…

When I began using GameSalad, I had three major aversions to buying the ‘Pro’ version for Windows ($300/year):

  1. Stability
  2. Features (on the Windows version)
  3. Learning Curve

The Windows version was the bastard step-child of the Mac one, always several versions behind, plagued with bugs, lacking the same features as it’s Mac counterpart. While there is a robust community of developers, the vast majority are Mac users, and so due to the great disparity between the Mac and Windows versions of the application, many of the tutorials were using the Mac version, which simply wouldn’t work the same way (if at all) on the Windows one.

So what did GameSalad do?

Well, in my last post, Windows had finally caught up to the Mac edition with the implication that they’d stay synced. Even so, the Windows version was prone to crashes on startup, but a couple of updates later and that seems to have been tackled.

As to the learning curve, the new startup screen features a link to official tutorial videos!

Unfortunately, There Ain’t No Such Thing as a Free Salad…well, not anymore…

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When I booted up GameSalad for the first time since patching, I was greeted with a 15 days remaining on my new ‘trial’ edition. No in-app explanation. Nothing in the ‘Help > About’. Zip. Zilch. Null…

Did I get a free trial of the ‘Pro’ version? What gives? Well, come to find out, their old CEO stepped down and the new one decided to start charging for the ‘Basic’ version ($19/mo).

So what did I do?

I uninstalled GameSalad. I know it’ll take me a hell of a lot longer than 15 days to learn how to use GameSalad. It’s initial appeal was that I could take my time and learn the tool at my own pace, and when I was ready, and had proven to myself that I was able to make (what I felt) was a product worth selling, I wouldn’t mind paying for the privilege of publishing it.

This is a good opportunity to change gears and maybe delve into Unity or Unreal…

GameSalad, Pyxels and New Beginnings

GameSalad Tosses It’s Salad

One of my biggest complaints about GameSalad in the past is that the Windows version seemed to be the bastard stepchild of MacOS one, and lacked much of the functionality, and the features it did share with it’s Mac counterpart sometimes behaved differently, making online guides hard to follow. Their latest update, announced a couple of weeks ago,  jumped from 10.5 to 13.14, which [I believe] finally brings the Windows version up to par with the MacOS one! This was exciting news for me, so I decided to download and install it over the weekend. As soon as i fired it up, a window popped up prompting me to login, followed immediately by a crash.

I couldn’t even log in because the application had already halted. Nothing in the event log to give me any clues as to what happened, no specific error message to chase down, it just had a heart attack and collapsed on my desktop… So, after uninstalling/reinstalling, and several reboots later, I decided to check the application to see if there was some kind of log, but alas, the only other thing of use in there was the updater, so I decided to give that a try.

Amazingly, after checking for updates and finding none (I was already on the latest release), it worked! Unfortunately, by then I’d lost interest in the messing with it and decided to move on to something else… Lessons learned? Break down and buy a used Mac? :|… nah. The only Apple devices (an iPad and AppleTV) I’ve ever owned were gifts, one of which I ended up giving away (the AppleTV), and other I use to play a time-killer games, watch videos and occasionally surf the web… Before I was ready to tackle GameSalad again, I decided to turn my attention to asset creation, which is something I needed practice with anyhow. So what’s next?

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Pixel Art

There’s something beautiful about well-done pixel art that many people can’t appreciate. It’s more than just a retro look and feel, there’s a real elegance to cramming  lots of detail into a tiny 16×16 or 32×32 pixel space. Most people don’t realize just how small that is! But what I didn’t expect to find was that there were highly specialized tools for creating pixel art repeatable tiles you could use to create game assets. One such program I found while watching video tutorials was Pyxel Edit. It was a paid program, but $9 USD isn’t much to me, so I decided to fork over the cash (good deal for free lifetime updates). It seemed fairly easy to learn, and had a built-in animation tool.

There’s a learning curve, that’s sure, as the application itself doesn’t come with a lot of documentation. The help file is a list of keyboard shortcuts, and the buttons all have right-click tooltips, but that’s about it.  Nevertheless, there are great videos on YouTube (e.g. Achebit) which discuss a great many ideas such as color palettes, shading, design and so forth. As such, I figure it would be good practice to make a few tiles sets, experiment a little and see what I can come up with rather than trying painstakingly hand draw platforms. There are several advantages to this:

  1. Tiles can serve as [reusable] building blocks, which can be used to rapidly create levels
  2. I can create characters, enemies and objects using the same tool
  3. I can save time by adding variety via palette shifts and minor modification

Well, I’ve got some things to work on, but still need to go back to square one (no pun intended) and think about fun and simplicity…

The Skill Gap

I received a survey from GameSalad recently, which gave prompted me to give some thought to why I hadn’t touched it in a while, probably a month and a half or so. While it’s true that I’ve been busy with other things, I feel that i’d hit a roadblock. In my last GameSalad-related post, I discussed creating a simple turn-based strategy, so I started thinking about the mechanics of it, and what sequence of behaviors would need to occur to make that possible:

  1. Select the character you wish to move (on touch)
  2. Spawn ‘movement’ tiles which display where a character can move to
  3. Upon touching a movement tile, moving the character to that tile and destroying the other tiles

Sounds simple, right? Well, there are issues:

  • Controlling what happens when you click the character more than once (keep spawning movement tiles?)
  • What if you only want to be able to move each character once per ‘turn’?
  • How do you keep track of ‘turns’? Global attributes you toggle on and off?

As you can see, it can get very complicated very quickly, and without any kind of guidance or best practices (e.g. templates), I often find myself getting stuck.

Try something simpler? A platformer maybe?

Well even that gets quite tricky and requires a lot of advanced behavior manipulation. There are hours of video tutorials that cover this, but essentially what I’d end up with is a monkey copy of someone else’s’ platform game with my own front-end, and by then, I may as well just buy a template and reskin it. So I decided to set that all aside for a moment and focus on what I could do, asset creation (artwork, sound effects, music). As I pointed out a couple of months ago, aimless make-it-up-as-you-go-along level design isn’t going to get me a cohesive  world. Perspective is also an issue, being that I was designing top-down perspective maps using 2D image manipulation tools, faking it by skewing and distorting 2D rectangular ‘wall’ vectors and and manual shading to create the illusion of ‘depth’. This seemed like a sloppy way to go about it, and that there were already lots of 3D engines available which could do a much better job. So what is all this leading to?

Simply put: I’m not a triple threat. Many years ago, I became familiar with this term through drama classes I took, and for those unfamiliar, it means the ability to Act, Sing and Dance. An actor who could do all three of these things well was considered to be highly desirable,  and a threat to other actors competing for the same part. Game development can be illustrated in the same way, being comprised essentially of:

  • Programming (scripting, coding, regular expressions, the ‘mechanics’ of the game)
  • Design (2D/3D artwork, animation, texturing etc.)
  • Sound (music, sound effects)

These three components are integral, and in a well-made game, they all fit together. So which of these things can I do?

  • Design
  • Writing and Story
  • 2D Artwork (texturing in particular)
  • Sound effects
  • Music

What do I not do well (or at all)?

  • Any kind of programming/scripting
  • 3D artwork (save for basic level design, but experience limited to 3D Game Studio)
  • Animation

It’s clear that GameSalad won’t bridge that gap, nor would I expect it to. I’m just going to have to accept that I won’t be a one-man development studio, and recruit help.

Nothing is Trivial

When I take a walk through the internet, I never know where I’ll end up. What started as a search for book reviews of a particular novel I was reading ended with a memorial dedicated to the gone, but not forgotten Cronan Thompson. I’d never heard of him nor would I have been likely to, given that our interests didn’t align. To paraphrase Freddy Mercury,MiST was never my scene and I don’t like Star Trek.”

Despite having little in common, I couldn’t help but find myself chuckling over some of his writings. He was whimsical, even brilliant beyond his years. I began to envy those who had the opportunity to match wits with him, and pity those who couldn’t appreciate his sense of humor. The more I read, the more I began to feel a deep sense of regret. The same crushing twinge I recall feeling the first time I heard Ferris Bueller’s  casual observation, “Life moves pretty fast, if you don’t stop and look around once in a while, you could miss it!”

Well, I had missed it. I will only ever know this person vicariously through what remains of his writings and the second-hand experiences of others. All I have left is the heartbreaking realization that you can never go back – the world will never be what it was, then and there. For better or worse, all we have is now. If there’s one lesson Cronan has taught me, it would be this: Indulge your passions, no matter how trivial they may be to others – for nothing is trivial.